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What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Sonjaks » Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:29 pm

I believe this is also a fundamental difference between US and European higher education. In Europe they may have an elimination exam (for any program, not just CI) and kick you out at some point. In American universities while they don't throw you out until you have managed to really screw up for several consecutive semesters, they also will not pass you or let you graduate with a degree (see the difference?) As a result some people spend 8 years as an undergrad, perhaps not doing much, but they also are not going to get their BA any time soon.

While in France a low graduation rate means the school is very good, the opposite is true in the US. It is a different perspective on education, for better or worse. Having been through both types of education, I can say that the latter is generally more pleasant and effective.

Ideally yes, every school would know right off the bat who is capable of graduating with a well-deserved degree in CI. But they can't know that for sure from one exam (again, US academic admissions do not generally allow for the same jury interview as in European universities, plus MIIS is trying to attract students from abroad so they use the distance admissions test in lieu of the in-person interview. I have seen the EDT and it is not as simple as writing an essay. It would be rather hard to fake). As a result, most CI programs also have elimination exams or evaluations of some sort; from what I have seen ETI and Lisbon are among the few that don't- ETI because they have both a different philosophy and more stringent admissions requirements compared to elsewhere, and Lisbon because Portuguese law does not allow you to be eliminated from a MA program halfway through.
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby schaemtsichfremd » Thu Dec 08, 2011 10:50 am

Sonjaks wrote: In American universities while they don't throw you out until you have managed to really screw up for several consecutive semesters, they also will not pass you or let you graduate with a degree (see the difference?) As a result some people spend 8 years as an undergrad, perhaps not doing much, but they also are not going to get their BA any time soon.


...which has the pleasant side effect of being very good for the universities' wallets (says the cynic who took 5 years to graduate :lol:).

Joking aside, while I find the American universities' way of doing things more humane for the students' feelings, I think there's an economic argument for generally low-tuition public European universities kicking people out who don't pass an exam since it ends up costing the state money to keep people who don't cut the mustard in college year after year after year. I'm guessing that they don't do it just to be mean.
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby gitanerousse » Thu Dec 08, 2011 9:21 pm

Sonjaks wrote:I believe this is also a fundamental difference between US and European higher education. In Europe they may have an elimination exam (for any program, not just CI) and kick you out at some point. In American universities while they don't throw you out until you have managed to really screw up for several consecutive semesters, they also will not pass you or let you graduate with a degree (see the difference?) As a result some people spend 8 years as an undergrad, perhaps not doing much, but they also are not going to get their BA any time soon.

While in France a low graduation rate means the school is very good, the opposite is true in the US. It is a different perspective on education, for better or worse. Having been through both types of education, I can say that the latter is generally more pleasant and effective.

Ideally yes, every school would know right off the bat who is capable of graduating with a well-deserved degree in CI. But they can't know that for sure from one exam (again, US academic admissions do not generally allow for the same jury interview as in European universities, plus MIIS is trying to attract students from abroad so they use the distance admissions test in lieu of the in-person interview. I have seen the EDT and it is not as simple as writing an essay. It would be rather hard to fake). As a result, most CI programs also have elimination exams or evaluations of some sort; from what I have seen ETI and Lisbon are among the few that don't- ETI because they have both a different philosophy and more stringent admissions requirements compared to elsewhere, and Lisbon because Portuguese law does not allow you to be eliminated from a MA program halfway through.


that might well be true, the different perspective on education, I have also been to universities in the US, 2 private and 1 public school. I know they system well, and I also know that most students do not stay in an undergrad program for much more than needed (approx 4 years), there are exceptions, sure, but I have not seen any in all 3 schools I have been to. You start in, say, 2005, and you already know you are the "class of 2009" (for your BA), and since you can take summer classes, obviously you can graduate in 3 1/2 years as well.
We are not talking about some people who attend part-time, and work, that is a totally different story.
I also wanted to mention that I have taken the MIIS EDT myself, and passed. it is a piece of cake. and you don't need a very strong A,B or C language to pass. this is a fact, I took it when my A was extremely weak (hadn't spoken it for years, so you can imagine the level!), and my C was ridiculous. Yet I passed. Strange, uh?
well no, MIIS wants you, even if you are mediocre. they want your money, and that is a fact too. Or else I would not have passed.
Not sure which system I prefer, European or American, I love the American system as there is almost no bureaucracy there (compared to France and Germany, for example, even the UK is bureaucratic compared to the US), and there is even less bureaucracy at MIIS. It is pleasant from that perspective, but for a good CI program (especially for European languages -not talking about Chinese), I would certainly agree that some of the European schools are better.
MIIS is very good for International Policy Studies, sure. And their MBA seems to be good too, and non-proliferation studies, terrorism studies, etc etc etc
I would not study CI there unless I had English and Chinese in my combination.
But that is my opinion.
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Andrew » Mon May 07, 2012 11:16 am

If anyone is interested in an in-depth looks at Monterey's early diagnostic tests, here is a lecture I ran across:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhhfbsU6rcM&feature=youtu.be

It's presented by Miryoung Sohn and is part of the Found in Translation lecture series, the rest of which can be found here:

http://www.miis.edu/academics/programs/gstile/found-in-translation-series/past-lectures

P.S. There was a discussion on page 1 of this thread about how all students are passed. As you can hear at the beginning of this lecture, that is incorrect. Some students are not able to graduate. Glad we settled that.
Last edited by Andrew on Mon May 07, 2012 6:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Sonjaks » Mon May 07, 2012 11:54 am

Merci!
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Ana-smile » Mon Dec 03, 2012 5:32 pm

Hello everyone!

I am looking at CI program with Russian as A or B language. Does anybody know anything about it? What about Spanish (as C language)? How good are those particular programs at MIIS? How possible is it to get a merit scholarrship for CI? I'll be grateful for any piece of information or advice. :)

Thank you in advance!
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby shadow147 » Sat Feb 16, 2013 8:33 pm

Hang on, I'm new here but I've noticed that alot of people are saying that they might consider Monterey if they had English and Chinese..

Well I have English and Chinese-- I'm a 4th year BA Chinese student at SOAS in London, and have been wanting to know which school would be the best possible school for me to go to in order to kickstart my Conference Interpreting Career-- These mentions of Monterey and English and Chinese have piqued my curiosity

Can anyone enlighten me?
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Kayan » Thu May 30, 2013 10:40 am

Of course, the best way to test the quality of MIIS is to try it by oneself, but that's almost impossible as regards the tuition fees: $34,970 for 2013-2014.
For that very reason, I would like to thank loveinterpreting for his valuable information.
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Re: What should one think about this Monterey Institute?

Postby Galina » Tue Aug 19, 2014 6:07 am

So I have been admitted to MIIS and Bath, and I shou,d say there aren't other decent options for A Russian. The reason why I chose MIIS is not because I believe in its superiority but because graduating in US does have advantages in terms of employment. European job market, and UK in particular, is more closed for non-EU residents compared to that in US. In addition, schools in France or Switzerland have additional requirement to the applicants aside from their language proficiency, aptitude and academic abilities. For instance, I was expected to travel to Geneva to sit tests twice before I would know whether I was excepted or not. There is no consideration to students who live far from Europe. Therefore, sometimes it's not about choosing the best school available but the one that suits one's situation and career goals.
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